Recently the BBC published this article on the refugee flow from Iraq. While there are roughly 1.8 million “internally displaced people” (i.e. Iraqis who have been forced from their homes, but live elsewhere in Iraq – many of whom are homeless) in Iraq, the UN estimates that there are 2 million Iraqi refugees in other Middle-Eastern countries (specifically, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Egypt). These numbers do not even include those refugees who have gone to Europe, North America, or elsewhere in Asia. While we can all likely understand why these people have fled their home country, it is nearly impossible to relate. The insecurity and fear they must feel is overwhelming. Little wonder why the UN has labelled this a humanitarian disaster.

The US has pledged $18m to the UNHCR (UN High Commission for Refugees), the agency attempting to “manage” the flow of refugees. Recently, the US set a target of granting asylum to some 7,000 Iraqi refugees. While this number does not begin to solve anything, it is a step in the right direction – especially in light of the fact that the US has only accepted about 500 refugees from Iraq since the beginning of “operations” there in 2003. It’s meager, but it is action. Four-million displaced, disenfranchised, and impoverished Iraqis doesn’t help anyone.

Luke 6:32-36: “If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even ‘sinners’ love those who love them. And if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to you? Even ‘sinners’ do that. And if you lend to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit is that to you? Even ‘sinners’ lend to ‘sinners,’ expecting to be repaid in full. But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful.”

Oh, by the way, here is the link to another BBC article (about the American refugee plan) – but I have summarized both of the articles here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s