The BBC published this article yesterday. Refugee children on the Greek island of Leros, which is near the coast of Turkey, have gone on a series of hunger strikes to protest the poor condition in the refugee ‘reception’ centers. Read the article HERE.

Eleven-year-old Salman Marufel sat cross-legged on a bed in an overcrowded dormitory and, using his fingers, hungrily devoured a plate of greasy chicken and rice.

It was, literally, the taste of victory.

Salman was the youngest of more than 100 other war children from Afghanistan who went on a series of hunger strikes to protest against what they claimed were the cramped, unsanitary conditions of their reception centre on the Aegean island of Leros, not far from the Turkish coast.

Continue the article HERE.

4 thoughts on “Refugee Hunger Strikes in Greece

  1. Hi there. LOVE your blog (which I stumbled upon while googling “athens refugee center” and so enjoy reading about the ministry and your lives! And since I’ve been following it for several months now, I am totally in love with your precious little girl, who is becoming more adorable with every blog post (if that is possible!)

    I found that the BBC article that you posted on the striking refugees gave me deeper understanding of how desperate these folks are to simply have a better life. That’s a depth of need that we westerners could probably never really grasp. Thanks for adding that for your readers.

    And to that, I would add (having lived in Greece and having many relatives still living in Greece) that when we consider the hardships of life for immigrants, we also consider the hardships caused to the Greeks by the influx of immigrants. I think we tend to demonize the Greeks for the way they handle immigrants (I don’t think YOU are doing that, but I have heard other westerners criticize Greece and as you know, it’s not just a black and white issue).

    After all, Greece is a small country. It has the luckless fortune of being the first place to which immigrants flee after leaving Turkey. Greece MUST deal with them. In my mind, the flow of immigrants to Greece is rather like someone you don’t know showing up on your doorstep and saying, “Hi. I’m here. Can I live with you?” You say, “Yikes! Who are you? I can barely afford to buy my own groceries…our house is so small…and besides, I don’t even know you!”

    So, I say, let’s try to understand how hard immigration is on Greeks as well as on the immigrants themselves. Hope that makes sense without coming across as preachy :).

    It’s no easy task, as of course you know full well. But what a blessing that you are part of the solution: sharing Christ, our only Hope, with those who yearn for life. May God bless you!

  2. Yeah, you make a good point. Thanks. Everyone wants someone to blame – and Greece is in a difficult situation. In fact, I’ve meet many Greeks who have a great deal of sympathy for the refugees, as many Greek families have been in similar situations within the last two generations (e.g. Greeks forced out of Asia Minor). For the situation to improve, it will certainly take cooperation between Afghanistan, the US, Greece, and the entire EU. Thanks for your comments.

  3. Yeah, you make a good point. Thanks. Everyone wants someone to blame – and Greece is in a difficult situation. In fact, I’ve meet many Greeks who have a great deal of sympathy for the refugees, as many Greek families have been in similar situations within the last two generations (e.g. Greeks forced out of Asia Minor). For the situation to improve, it will certainly take cooperation between Afghanistan, the US, Greece, and the entire EU. Thanks for your comments.

  4. Yeah, you make a good point. Thanks. Everyone wants someone to blame – and Greece is in a difficult situation. In fact, I’ve meet many Greeks who have a great deal of sympathy for the refugees, as many Greek families have been in similar situations within the last two generations (e.g. Greeks forced out of Asia Minor). For the situation to improve, it will certainly take cooperation between Afghanistan, the US, Greece, and the entire EU. Thanks for your comments.

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